WUSHU - KUNG FU FITNESS CENTER 尚 武 體 育 會

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WHAT IS WUSHU?

Wushu is literally translated as “martial arts” and, when written, is comprised of the two Chinese characters “wu” (martial/military) and “shu” (arts).  Chinese characters are based on pictograph, where words were originally represented by their physical appearance.  The character for “wu” is the result of two simpler characters, when separated, has been interpreted as “self-defense”.

The term “wushu” comes from Mandarin Chinese, the national language of China, while the term “kung-fu” comes from Cantonese, a dialect of the Chinese language, and both are often used interchangeably to refer to Chinese martial arts in general in English.  It was created in the People's Republic of China after 1949, in an attempt to nationalize the practice of traditional Chinese martial arts.  Wushu is often used to refer to modern competitive taolu (choreographed forms) and sanda (sparring/fighting) while kung-fu refers to the classical counterpart from which wushu is derived.

The Chinese martial arts are made up of numerous styles which are often categorized into internal (nei jia) and external (wai jia) arts.  Internal Chinese martial arts focus on the use of the relaxed body and is used to describe styles such as Tai Chi Quan, Bagua Zhang, Hsing-I, and Baji.  While typical physical characteristics of external Chinese martial arts include physical development, speed, and explosive movements as is found in Long Fist, Southern Fist, Ground Tumbling Boxing, and Eagle Claw - both internal and external arts require coordination of the mind and body, and it has been said that they have the same destination while simply taking different paths.

WHY WUSHU?

For children in their formative years, self-discipline is important and by implementing repetition, hard work, rhythm, details, and rules, wushu is a fantastic way to improve the learning process.  Wushu will provide an activity to do all year round to compliment your other seasonal physical activities and help you become a well-rounded individual since it requires thought in addition to its physical components.  Because wushu is skill-based, it is a great way for friends and families with diverse physical talents and abilities to participate in together. It is also an amazing way to develop friendships with interesting people that can last a lifetime.

For professionals who are at your desks or vehicles all day, exercise is absolutely essential.  In addition to looking better, exercise has been shown to stimulate chemicals in your brain which can also make you feel better.  Numerous studies show that exercise helps to combat depression while improving self-esteem.  Wushu can also strengthen your heart and lungs; help improve the quality of your sleep; improve your concentration and focus at work; and has been known to prevent type II diabetes, osteoporosis, and types of cancer. Besides improving the quality and longevity of your life, wushu is simply fun!

For athletes, wushu is a powerful way to cross-train because it is a comprehensive art form that involves running, jumping, kicking, punching, flexibility, explosive linear and circular movements, and much more that will make you the most effective athlete you can be.  Additionally, the mental focus, emotional clarity, and physical awareness will enable you to reach your full potential as an athlete.

For performers, your presentation and being in shape are both imperative. Wushu’s performance aspects prepare you to be in a highly competitive position if you would like to be considered for parts involving action sequences, while helping you get in shape like a top athlete.  Wushu training helped make Jet Li, Jackie Chan, Keanu Reeves, Jason Statham, Donnie Yen, Zoe Saldana, Carrie-Ann Moss, Milla Jovovich, and Uma Thurman international super-stars.

Who can do wushu?

Anybody can do wushu!  Wushu is skill-based, so regardless of your age, gender, physical attributes, or experience, you can be taught wushu through our systematic teaching process.  To find out how you can achieve your goals, Contact Us NOW!​

WHAT IS TAI CHI?

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Tai Chi Chuan, also known as Taiji Quan, was originally developed in ancient China as a martial art based on the concepts of Yin and Yang for the purpose self-defense.  Tai Chi Chuan has been translated as “the grand ultimate fist” and is characterized by it's slow-moving, graceful, low-impact movements promoting serenity while connecting the mind and body, which is why it is often considered meditation in motion.

Why do Tai Chi Chuan?

For adults who may be at your desks or vehicles all day, exercise is absolutely essential.  In addition to looking better, Tai Chi Chuan has been shown to stimulate chemicals in your brain which can also make you feel better.  Numerous studies show that Tai Chi Chuan's other benefits include:

  • reduction of anxiety and/or depression
  • improvement of balance, flexibility, and muscular strength
  • improvement of overall sleep quality
  • improvement of cardiovascular fitness in older adults
  • an increase in energy, endurance, and agility
  • reduction of falls in older adults

In addition to the benefits above, a Harvard Medical School study recently found that Tai Chi Chuan also helps combat ailments such as arthritis, low bone density, breast cancer, heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, Parkinson's disease, sleep deprivation, and strokes.  Besides improving the quality and longevity of your life, Tai Chi Chuan is simply fun!

CHEN STYLE
Traditional Chen family-style (陳式,Chenshi) Tai Chi Chuan is the oldest and the parent of all other Tai Chi styles.  It was created by Chen Wangting, the 9th generation ancestor of the Chen Family as a family art with the intention of passing it to his descendants.  Chen-style is characterized by Silk reeling (chán sī jìn; 纏絲勁), alternating fast / slow motion and bursts of power (fa jin; 發勁). Traditional Chen Tai Chi Chuan can be practiced for its health benefits and as an internal martial art.  The Chen style offers a martial art system characterized by low powerful stances, whole-body twining / coiling movements, stomping, and explosive releases of power. This internal martial art embodies both yin and yang energies.  Training consists of bare hand routines, push-hand practice, and weapons forms including broad sword (dao),  straight sword (jian), staff (gun), and spear (qiang).  The complete system develops the practitioner's qi (vital energy) and the practitioner's stability, balance, leg strength, and correct body alignment.

YANG STYLE
Yang family-style (楊氏, Yángshi) Tai Chi Chuan its many variations is the most popular and widely practiced style in the world today and the second in terms of seniority among the primary five family styles of Tai Chi Chuan (Chen, Yang, Sun, Wu, Ng).  The Yang family first became involved in the study of Tai Chi Chuan in the early 19th century. The founder of the Yang-style was Yang Lu-chan (楊露禪, 1799–1872), who studied with the Chen family household under Chen Chang-hsing starting in 1820.  Yang eventually became a teacher and his subsequent expression and development of Tai Chi Chuan became known as the Yang-style.  Yang style Tai Chi Chuan is also practiced for its health benefits and as an internal martial art.  The Yang style is characterized by higher stances and more emphasis on slow flowing movements along with various hand and weapons forms similar to Chen style.

HUNYUAN STYLE
Hunyuan Tai Chi Chuan, also known as Chen Style Hunyuan Tai Chi (陳氏混元太極拳), is a traditional system of martial arts and self-cultivation. It is a branch of Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan that was developed by Feng Zhiqiang (馮志強), one of the greatest practitioners and teachers of Chen Tai Chi during the 20th century. Master Feng was one of the top disciples of Chen Fa Ke, the first person to teach Chen Tai Chi openly in China.  Hunyuan Tai Chi is unique in that it seeks the original roots of Tai Chi practice by reintegrating Qigong into form movements, and emphasizing circular movements and other movement strategies that embody Yin-Yang theory.  Practice includes the exploration of key basic postures (the 8 Postures of Tai Chi Chuan), solo forms (including short simplified forms, and the original long form of Chen Tai Chi), Cannon Fist forms (fast forms), weapons practice, and self-defense applications of the forms. The curriculum also includes extensive push hands practice and Silk Reeling exercises.

Who can do Tai Chi Chuan?
Anybody can do Tai Chi Chuan! Tai Chi Chuan is skill-based, self-paced, and gentle so regardless of your age, gender, physical attributes, or experience, you can be taught Tai Chi Chuan at our modern training facility.  To find out how you can achieve your goals, contact us NOW!

WING CHUN

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Wing Chun (詠春) is a Chinese martial art utilizing both striking and grappling while specializing in close-range fighting techniques and self-defense.

HISTORY
The earliest known mention of Wing Chun date to the period of Red Boat Opera in the late 1800s / early 1900s.  The common legend as told by Yip Man involves the young woman Yim Wing Chun during the period after the destruction by the Qing government of the Southern Shaolin Temple.

Having refused a marriage proposal from a local warlord, Yim Wing Chun said she would reconsider if the warlord could defeat her in a fight. She soon met a Buddhist nun named Ng Mui of the Shaolin Temple and asked the nun to teach her to fight.  According to legend Ng Mui taught Yim Wing Chun a new system of martial art inspired by the nun's observations of a battle between a Snake and a Crane.   Yim Wing Chun was then able to beat the warlord in a fight. Yim Wing Chun afterwards married Leung Bac Chou and taught him the style, which was later named after her.

CURRICULUM
Hand Forms
Wing Chun forms consist of individual exercise routines with offensive and defensive movements for developing self-awareness, reflex, sensitivity, and balance.  Forms also train the practitioner how to generate proper force when applying Wing Chun techniques.

The first, and most important form in Wing Chun, Siu Lim Tao (小念頭) is the foundation from which all succeeding forms and techniques are based upon.  Fundamental rules of balance and body structure are developed here. 

The second form, Chum Kiu (尋橋) focuses on coordinated body movements and entry techniques to "bridge the gap" between practitioner and opponent and move in to disrupt their structure and balance.  Close-range attacks using the elbows and knees are also developed here. It also teaches methods of recovering position and centerline when in a compromised position where Siu Nim Tao structure has been disrupted.

The third form, Biu Jee (鏢指) is composed of short-range and long-range techniques, low kicks and sweeps, and "emergency techniques" to counter-attack when structure and centerline have been seriously compromised, such as when the practitioner is seriously injured.  As well as pivoting and stepping movements, more upper body and stretching is developed to increase power. These movements include very close range elbow strikes and finger thrusts to the throat.

The Muk Yan Jong (木人樁) form is performed against a “wooden dummy", a thick wooden post with three arms and a leg mounted on a slightly springy frame representing a stationary human opponent.  Wooden dummy practice aims to refine a practitioner's understanding of angles, positions, and footwork, and to develop full body power. It is here that the open hand forms are pieced together and understood as a whole.

Weapons
Upon completion of learning the open-hand forms, the student is ready to progress to weapons.  Wing Chun weapons consist of a Long Pole form called "Luk Dim Boon Gwun" or "6 1/2 Point Pole" which uses the shoulder as the centerline and is usually taught first.  The power from the long bridge of the two arms is concentrated into one point and thrust out to different positions in the form which only has six and one-half techniques - the last being the half, a rapid downward movement from the chest.  The Long Pole is followed by a Knife Form called "Baat Cham Dao" or "Eight Cutting Blades".  "Baat" is the number eight, "Cham" is to cut or slash, and "Dao" refers to a single edged blade such as a knife or sword.  This is usually the final form taught to a Wing Chun student.

Chi Sao (Sticking Hands)
Chi Sao (黐手) or "sticking hands” are exercise drills used to develop automatic reflexes upon contact and the idea of "sticking" to the opponent ("sensitivity training”).  The objective is to protect your centerline while simultaneously attacking your opponent's centerline.  In Wing Chun, this is practiced by two individuals maintaining contact with each other's forearms while executing techniques, thereby training each other to sense changes in body mechanics, pressure, and momentum.  The increased sensitivity gained from this drill helps a practitioner attack and counter an opponent's movements precisely, quickly, and with appropriate techniques.

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Sifu Sam Zhang has been training Kung Fu from an early age and mastering the Wing Chun (詠春) system under the lineage of the late Grandmaster Yip Man (業問) as Official Disciple and Instructor.

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He is also an instructor of Chen Style Tai Chi (陳氏太極) with expertise in Chen traditional long forms and weapons forms.

Qi Gong 氣 功

ANCIENT PATHWAYS TO HEALTH, HAPPINESS AND A LONG LIFE

Qigong 氣功 exercises are a wide variety of traditional Asian practices designed to regulate and balance the body’s internal vital energy – Qi 氣.  While the word “Qigong” is a relatively new term (developed during the twentieth century), many systems today known as Qigong have been practiced and revered in Asia for over 2,000 years.  Like martial arts, there are many schools of Qigong practice, each with different training methods and purposes.

Despite the many different approaches to Qigong, all share in common the Three Regulations (san tiao 三調). These three are the regulation of the body (tiao shen 調身), the regulation of the breath (tiao xi 調息), and the regulation of the mind-intention (tiao xin 調心). Qigong exercises can be practiced by people of any age or health status, and with any level of prior experience.

Here are some of the Qigong that we focus on in classes at the Wushu - Kung Fu Fitness Center.

Daoist Taiji Stick and Ruler Neigong – 道家太極棒尺內功

The Taiji Stick and Ruler Neigong (Qigong) uses two implements, the Taiji Stick (太極棒) and the Taiji Ruler (太極尺) to focus Qi in the Dantian (丹田 - energetic center of the body), and then circulate it through the major channels. Doing so strengthens the body for both health and martial arts purposes. This system was handed down in a lineage from the Song Dynasty sage Chen Tuan. While the name of the system includes the word Taiji (Tai Chi), it predates and developed independently of the martial art Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan).

Six Sounds for Nourishing Life (Six Healing Sounds) – 六字訣養生功

The Six Sounds for Nourishing Life (also known as the Six Healing Sounds) are exercises based on the Chinese medical concepts of the internal organs.  Each of the most essential six organs can be regulated and balanced with a combination of posture, breath, and sound intonation.  The practice of healing sounds revitalizes and balances the internal organs.  They can be used for general health maintenance or even treating specific diseases.

Twenty Four Seasonal Node Daoyin – 二十四節氣導引

The Twenty Four Seasonal Node Daoyin are a set of 24 exercises that harmonize the body with each of the 24 seasonal divisions in the classical Chinese calendar. Furthermore, these exercises help target specific acupuncture channels and treat a variety of diseases. The regular practice of Seasonal Qigong is an excellent method of harmonizing the body with the external environment. This form is also quite special as it was passed down in a direct unbroken lineage from the Daoist Sage Chen Tuan to Dr. McCann, our resident instructor.

Chen’s Silk Reeling Exercises – 陳氏纏絲功

Silk Reeling exercises originated with Chen Style Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan). They utilize gentle circular movements to loosen joints, improve overall flexibility and improve overall health. Each exercise focuses on a specific acupuncture channel or acupuncture point, and can be used to treat musculoskeletal problems. The regular practice of Silk Reeling also improves martial arts skill.

Other Practices

Other related practices include self massage and acupressure for health (自我按摩療法), patting acupuncture points and channels (拍打), basic meditation (靜功), and other forms of Qigong.

Hunyuan Taiji (Tai Chi) 混元太極拳

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Hunyuan Tai Chi (陳氏混元太極拳), also known as Chen Style is a traditional system of martial arts and self-cultivation. It is a branch of Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan that was developed by Feng Zhiqiang (馮志強), one of the greatest practitioners and teachers of Chen Tai Chi during the 20th century. Master Feng was one of the top disciples of Chen Fa Ke, the first person to teach Chen Tai Chi openly in China.


Hunyuan Tai Chi is unique in that it seeks the original roots of Tai Chi practice by reintegrating Qigong into form movements, and emphasizing circular movements and other movement strategies that embody Yin-Yang theory. Practice includes the exploration of key basic postures (the 8 Postures of Taijiquan), solo forms (including short simplified forms, and the original long form of Chen Tai Chi), Cannon Fist forms (fast forms), weapons practice, and self-defense applications of the forms. The curriculum also includes extensive push hands practice and Silk Reeling exercises.


Our Hunyuan Tai Chi teacher, Dr. Henry McCann, is a 12th generation lineage disciple of Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan, and a 3rd generation lineage disciple of Hunyuan Chen Style Tai Chi Chuan. He is a long time personal student of Wang Fengming, and Master Wang was one of Feng Zhiqiang’s top disciples and his son-in-law. Dr. Henry McCann is certified as a Tai Chi teacher by theWorld Chen Style Hunyuan Taiji Association.

The link for the more information is: http://www.asianmedicine.org/hunyuan-taiji/

Taiji (Tai Chi) Push Hands & Adjunct Exercises

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Push Hands (Tui Shou 推手) is one of the most important partnered practice in traditional Taiji, and is a vital complement to solo forms practice. Push Hands allows practitioners to test the basic principles of balance and centeredness, as well as integrity of entire body structure. In this class we will also practice other important adjunct exercises such as Silk Reeling (纏絲功), Taiji Ball (太極球), Taiji Eight Methods (太極八法; both with and without a partner), and Qin Na (擒拿). Class is open to both Chen and Yang style practitioners. Prerequisite is knowing at least one Taiji hand form, or approval by the Sifus. See below for Grandmaster Feng demonstrating Push Hands.


WATCH VIDEO:

PUSH HANDS

PRAYING MANTIS 南派螳螂

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Jook Lum (“Bamboo Forest”) Southern Praying Mantis is one of the four main branches within the Southern Praying Mantis style of Kung Fu and was created in the 18th century by Monk Sam Dot.  The style is native to the Hakka communities of Southern China and is closely associated with other Hakka styles.

Jook Lum Southern Praying Mantis places heavy emphasis on close-range fighting techniques and is known for its short explosive strength and rapid hand movement methods.  The style applies internal and external energy techniques through fluid hand and arm movements targeting specific points of the body.  Leg movements and footwork are designed to quickly move within striking range of an opponent and utilizes low kicks.

Like other southern style Chinese martial arts, Southern Praying Mantis is also characterized by strong stances and a powerful waist to complement fast striking and offensive hand maneuvers.  Training focuses on stances, body forms, hand strikes, sticky/touching hands, and application of Yin energy.  Among the diverse forms, “Sam Bo Gin” is considered one of the most important in the Southern Praying Mantis system.  It is a “Qigong” based form and is the first one to be taught.

A student in our Jook Lum Southern Praying Mantis class will receive instruction in the traditional Praying Mantis forms, two-person defensive/offensive application routines, and weapons such as staff and double butterfly swords.  Class is limited to adult students with foundation skills.

Great Grandmaster Lam Wing Fay

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The late Great Grandmaster Lam Wing Fay (also known as Lam Sang out of respect from his peers) of Hakka descent immigrated to the United States from China by way of England during the early 1950’s.  He made his home in New York City’s Chinatown where he, for a short period of time, taught at the Sung Tsing Association during the evenings.  By the mid 1950’s, he was invited to teach at the Hip Sing Association at 3 Pell Street.

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His stay at Hip Sing was  also for a brief while.  Great Grandmaster Lam Sang established his association of the Chinese Freemason Athletic Club and taught there by the late 1950’s at 96 Mott Street, where he accepted his most dedicated disciples.  By 1963, Jook Lum Gee Tong Long Pai was the largest Kung Fu school in Chinatown New York.  He continued teaching until 1969 when he retired to Taiwan.  He returned to New York in 1981 and taught privately until his passing in 1991.

* Biography courtesy of Sifu Norman Chin

LION DANCE

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Chinese Lion Dance has a very long history and there are many versions of its origin, some based on fictional stories passed down for generations and others based on historical facts.  The lion dance has existed in Chinese culture for more than a thousand years. Lion dance originated in the Han Dynasty

(205 BC - 220 AD) and reached its peak during the Tang Dynasty (716 - 907 AD).  Lions are considered a divine animal of nobility and dignity.  It is a symbol of strength, wisdom and courage in Chinese culture.

The Lion Dance has two different types - northern and southern.  The two differ in the style and appearance of the lion.  The northern style lion dance is mainly performed for entertainment during festivities and the colors of the lion are typically red, orange and yellow with a shaggy appearance.  The southern style lion has a distinctive head, displays a variety of colors, has a single horn and mirror(s).  The northern style lion is popular in northern China while the southern style lion is popular in southern China, particularly in Guangdong and neighboring provinces.  The tradition of lion dance continued with the Chinese immigrants who settled in different parts of the world, including the United States, Canada, and Latin America.  Lion dances are seen in Chinatowns everywhere especially during Chinese New Year celebrations, business grand openings, other festive events, and competitions. 

The presence of a lion is regarded as an auspicious sign and the lion dance plays a significant role in all cultural festivals in China. Traditional lion dance has a close relation with the martial arts and the dancers are typically kung fu practitioners.  Southern systems of kung fu do not consider a training hall to be complete without having a lion dance team.  With this honor comes great responsibility to train hard and conscientiously as the training hall is often judged by the skills of its lion dance team in performances and competitions.  The colorful lion and its skillful acrobatics along with the dramatic musical accompaniment of a drum, cymbals and gong make for a very exciting and memorable experience of a unique and traditional aspect of Chinese culture. 

Depending on its place of origin in China, the head of the lion can take one of two shapes, the Hoksan (Crane Mountain) and Futsan (Buddha Mountain) lion.  Presently, the Wushu-Kung Fu Fitness Center teaches the traditional Futsan style, which incorporates powerful moves and stances often used in kung-fu, thus requiring strength and stamina from the dancers.  The Southern lion is a composite of magical and mystical elements.  Features of the Southern lion include the horn of the phoenix, the ears and tail of the unicorn, the beard of a dragon, and a mirror on its forehead to ward off evil or demons (demons are prevalent in Chinese superstition and mythology).  The Southern lion head and body come in various color schemes.  Traditional color schemes give the lion type its name, which are based on the “Three Generals (or Heroes)” also known as the “Three Sworn Brothers of the Peach Garden” from Chinese history and immortalized in the Chinese classic novel, "Romance of the Three Kingdoms".  Their names and hence the lion's names (based on the color theme) are Liu Bei (colorful face, white beard), Gwan Gung (red face, black beard), and Zhang Fei (black or green face, black beard).  These Generals were brothers and are also known as first, second and third sons - Liu Bei being “big or first brother”, Gwan Gung being the “second brother”, and Zhang Fei being the “third brother”.  Liu Bei is the most auspicious and wise lion and is the one used by long established kung fu training halls or associations.  Liu Bei is also the one most often used in lion dance performances where good luck and prosperity want to be ensured.  Gwan Gung is the brave and loyal lion used by newly established kung fu training halls or associations, while Zhang Fei is known as the fighting lion because of its brash and pugnacious nature and is used by new training halls or associations wishing to establish themselves in the community.  The golden lion (Huang Joon) has also become very popular. 

Popular Folklore

The story of Guan Yin’s Compassion

Another origin story places the lion as a mystical creature that existed in the heavens.  The lion was a playful and mischievous creature, so much so that one day it caused too much trouble for the King of Heaven to control.  As punishment, the Jade Emperor chopped off the lion’s horn (the source of its life) and it died.  Guan Yin (the Goddess of Mercy) felt sorry so she tied the lion’s horn back on with a red sash with golden leaves and chanted to bring it back to life.  If you look closely at any lion, you can see a red sash tied on its horn.

The story of the Nian
The legend says "Nian" was a fierce monster that liked kidnapping children and terrorizing villages.  Eventually, a lion defeated and chased the monster away but Nian vowed to return the next year.  This time the villagers did not have a lion to protect them.  They solved the problem by creating a costume likeness of a lion and two villagers used it to scare Nian away.  This is the reason the lion dance is performed every Chinese New Year.  The legend also says that loud noises from the drum, other instruments, and firecrackers helped to scare the Nian away.  Red is worn during the New Year’s celebration because it was believed Nian was afraid of the color red.  "Nian” has become the Chinese word for year.

The Story of the Monk

Once upon a time a monk had a dream in which there were many sorrows and evils plaguing the land.  The monk prayed and asked the gods how he could prevent these evils from occurring.  The gods told him that a lion would protect them and fight back the evils.  The Chinese people had never seen a lion before, but had heard stories that the lion was the king of all the other animals.  The monk then combined all the lucky or magical animals he could think of and created the lion.


LION DANCE TRAINING CLASS

Every Saturdays at 3:00pm

WATCH VIDEO: https://youtu.be/nULEoQXts0A

LION DANCE VIDEO

WEDDING OCCASSION

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

CELEBRATE your BIRTHDAY with a Kung Fu Party at the Wushu-Kung Fu Fitness Center!

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A great time for all ages -- Children, Teenagers and Adults!
Contact us for more details and reserve your date now.
Parties are scheduled for Saturday afternoons (3:30 pm / 5:30 pm / 7:30 pm).
Each party will have 1 hour Kung Fu / Funtime activities and 30 minutes party room.
Children can also invite Po the Panda to join the fun with our Panda Package

and/or have an exciting Chinese Lion Dance performance!

Kung Fu Party Package:
(Available Saturday at 3:30pm, 5:30pm, 7:30pm)

Includes up to 20 guests
1 hour Kung Fu Lesson and Funtime Activities!
30 minutes in the Party Room
Party Music
Kung Fu Lesson Gift Certificate (1 per guest)
Tables, Chairs, and Tablecloth
Invitations

Saturday Parties: $350
$15 per extra guest

Invite Kung Fu Panda to your party: $50

Lion Dance - $50

Kung Fu Party Package:

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Includes up to 20 guests

1 hour Kung Fu Lesson and Funtime Activities!

30 minutes in the Party Room

Party Music

Kung Fu Lesson Gift Certificate (1 per guest)

Tables, Chairs, and Tablecloth 

Invitations

Saturday at 3:30pm, 5:30pm, 7:30pm

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Saturday Parties: $350

$15 per extra guest

Invite Kung Fu Panda to your party: $50

Lion Dance - $50


BOOK NOW!!! Call or Email us

973-887-3888

wushukungfu@me.com

SUMMER CAMP

REGISTER for 2019 SUMMER CAMP 夏 令 營

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Our Wushu Summer Camp is most suitable for kids & teens from 7 to 19 yrs. old.

Join our indoor kung fu camp at our modern facility dedicated to young athletes of all skill levels this summer! Training in martial arts can begin at a very young age.  For children in their formative years, self-discipline is important and by implementing rules, details, and repetition, Wushu is a fantastic way to improve the learning process while having a great time!  Wushu allows you to develop strength, balance, agility, stamina, confidence, flexibility and improve coordination.  It can also help individuals to excel at other sports and improve focus. Lastly, Wushu is an amazing way to develop friendships with interesting people that can last a life time.  Anyone can do Wushu! 

Enjoy Wushu Training, Arts & Crafts, Lion Dance, Games, and Cultural Activities.


WATCH CAMP VIDEOS: 

SUMMER CAMP VIDEO

SCHOOL BREAK CAMP VIDEO

SCHOOL BREAK Mini Camp Program

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School break does not mean a break to just sit and play in front of your computer the whole day. Here at WKFFC Spring Break Program, we offer a fun school-break day camps beyond our Summer Camp. Where kids get mentally and physically healthy through fun activities that are good for them!  Enjoy Wushu Training, Arts & Crafts, Lion Dance, Games, and Cultural Activities.

WKFFC Camps Are Available Throughout the Year:

Fall Break

Winter Break

Spring Break

Long-Weekend Holidays

WKFFC KIDS offers a variety of healthy programs in children of all ages.  Our program helps improve strength, balance, agility, stamina, confidence, flexibility, and coordination while having a great time!  In the program, we help children lead a healthy life with a mix of martial arts, games, and fun activities.  It also can help individuals to excel at other sports and improve focus.

It is easy, fun, and parents can go to work or even go out on a date! Just $60 a day from 9am to 3pm.  (Lunch is optional - Aftercare is available from 3pm to 6pm) 

CAMP FEES   

$60 Full Day   

$30 Half Day

SUMMER CAMP

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FUNTASTIC CAMP WEEKS
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.


CAMP FEES
Week 1     July 8 to 12      -        $350.00
Week 2    July 15 to 19     -        $650.00
Week 3    July 22 to 26    -        $900.00
Week 4    Aug 5 to 9        -      $1200.00
Week 5    Aug 12 to 16      -     $1450.00
Week 6    Aug 19 to 23     -     $1650.00


PER DAY
FULL DAY $70

HALF DAY $40

由即日起至3月 31日前登記,
可獲九折優惠!
PRE-REGISTRATION BY 3/31
RECEIVE 10% DISCOUNT

& FREE CAMP SHIRT
Lunch $6 (Optional)
Aftercare Hours
3pm - 6pm (Optional)


Early Drop Off 8:30am


REGISTER NOW!!!

973-887-3888

wushukungfu@me.com

SCHOOL FIELD TRIP

SCHOOL FIELD TRIP

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Take your students for a field trip to our facility for an awesome experience! Learn Chinese culture, Intro to Chinese Martial Arts, Lion Dance lesson. 

WATCH VIDEO:  FIELD TRIP VIDEO

Call or Email us for Fee Schedule

973-887-3888

wushukungfu@me.com

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